• June 20, 2020
6 Comments



What are human beings really like? Why do some hurt the most fragile people whilst others protect them at great personal cost? Grounded in 25 years’ experience as a human rights lawyer and academic researcher grappling with some of humanity’s toughest questions, Dexter Dias QC shares powerful stories of resilience, courage and bravery and tells us why his research leaves him fundamentally hopeful.

Dexter Dias QC is an award-winning international human rights barrister, part-time judge and prize-winning researcher at Cambridge and Harvard. He’s author of Amazon bestselling book The Ten Types of Human –

His areas of specialism include: terrorism, female genital mutilation, gender and honour-based violence, human trafficking and modern slavery, child soldiering, domestic violence and children in the criminal justice system. He has been instrumental in changing the law to better protect girls at risk of gender-based violence. During the last 25 years, Dexter has been involved in some of the biggest legal cases involving human rights, murder, crimes against humanity, terrorism, war crimes, contentious custodial deaths and genocide.

Read more about Dexter here:

At TEDxExeter 2018 we focussed on making connections – and building bridges. Our speakers challenged us to reflect on how, in this interconnected, interdependent world, global issues affect all of our lives, and our actions affect others. In these turbulent times of shock political outcomes, “fake news”, data breaches, war, mass migration, rapid technological progress and climate change we believe that ideas have the power to change attitudes, lives, and ultimately, the world.

TEDxExeter Curator – Claire Kennedy @clairekennedy__ –
Production Manager – Andy Robertson @geekdadgamer –
Film & Livestream – First Sight Media @firstsightmedia – Dexter Dias QC is an award-winning international human rights barrister, part-time judge and prize-winning researcher at Cambridge and Harvard. His areas of specialism include: terrorism, female genital mutilation, gender and honour-based violence, human trafficking and modern slavery, child soldiering, domestic violence and children in the criminal justice system. He has been instrumental in changing the law to better protect girls at risk of gender-based violence. During the last 25 years, Dexter has been involved in some of the biggest legal cases involving human rights, murder, crimes against humanity, terrorism, war crimes, contentious custodial deaths and genocide. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

Nguồn: https://dereks-sarasota.com

Xem thêm bài viết khác: https://dereks-sarasota.com/tong-hop/

Author

khang@mmtgroup.vn

6 thoughts on “Why, in a world of injustice and vanishing human rights, I choose to hope | Dexter Dias | TEDxExeter

  1. I've just been reading Dexter's book and I find it helpful to hear him talk to understand it a little more. I'm intrigued by what he is saying and the way that he says it. I love the way that he tells stories, and the knowledge that he is so motivated by the stories of particular people. This is a good thing for any of us to remember – the power of particular stories. I do find it hard to focus in on the ten types of human – I keep on forgetting what the types are. But he does something interesting – he tells us repeatedly about the hardwiring of the human, and then we learn how this is undone by particular (good) human beings. I think that he is writing about adaptability – though he calls it resilience. He has really learned about the wiring for compassion, and this is what he keeps on re-discovering. His book is a challenge – I can't fathom why he has to find his stories in such distant places, when they would just as easily present themselves at home. But maybe that is part of the point….he makes these stories feel like ones that you want to bring home with you. I keep on connecting his stories to philosophical points about generosity and altruism. I really like that his book is making me think so much – I don't know if there really are ten types of human in the ways that he has said, or ten different technologies that can activate our brains and hearts and spirits. It's well worth reading his book – such a relief that he is not a psychologist telling about personality types. We are formed by our history and our functions. Lovely work

  2. There are many different organizations fighting for their own agenda in the name of equality. You can't advocate human rights by segregating yourself from the rest of humanity. I think it's time we founded an organization based on being a decent human being.

    "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." These words don't belong to just one race. They belong to all of mankind. To all of sentient existence; regardless of age, race, gender, religion or political affiliation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *